Time to Choose a Bathtub

We’ve talked about remodeling bathrooms and plumbing issues to keep in mind, choosing the right faucets and the right showers. Now it’s time to talk bathtubs.

Many options exist for bathtubs depending on space, style, and budget.  Some tubs are basic all-function tubs that are meant to be used for you, the kids and even the dog. Other tubs focus on pure indulgence.

Make sure you determine what your desired function of the tub is before you start your search.

Most built-in basics, including those that double as a tub-shower combination, can be found at your local home improvement store.  And, any more, you can even find whirlpool, air tubs, soaking, and walk-in tubs pretty easily as well.

As you determine the type of tub you want for your home, including the materials in which it is made, you will also want to give some consideration to installation.

Recessed. This installation is used for rectangular tubs adjacent to three walls.

Platform. Tubs generally drop into a deck type structure built into its own enclosure and usually right next to the shower. This works really well with whirlpool and air baths since the deck can hide pumps, and any plumbing and hardware used.

Undermount.The difference between an undermount and a platform is that the undermount’s rim is usually covered by some sort of material like stone or tile and gets support from underneath instead of having the tub hanging from the deck.

Freestanding. As the name implies, the tub is literally standing on its own without any support. A good example would be a claw tub. It’s important to have this tub close to plumbing lines.

Tubs are made from different materials providing even more options based on your taste in style and budget.

Acrylic.A plastic material with a high gloss that is lightweight and easy to form. Repairs can be made much easier than a tub with a porcelain surface.

Fiberglass gelcoat.This creates a glossy, easy-to-clean surface and is very durable.

Composite. Perfect for second story bathrooms, this engineered material offers the same heat retention as cast iron at only a third of the weight.

Cultured marble. A solid-surface material that is produced from crushed marble and resin, it has the ability to have scratches buffed out, but cracks can’t be repaired.

Porcelain on steel. Although susceptible to chipping and rusting, you can get the same look and heat retention as cast iron at a lighter weight.

Cast Iron. An old-fashioned tub of cast iron is one of the most durable and long-lasting tubs but may require structural reinforcement because of its weight.

As always, any questions just give us a call.